The Google OS

Nick Bradbury chimes in on the future of the Internet, your desktop and the Google onslaught. An interesting comment thread ensued.
I like Google and I like what they stand for, but I can’t help but think they have a “let’s just do cool useful stuff and figure out how this all folds into a business model later.” Unless of course, they’re sitting on a Master Plan that they aren’t sharing with the rest of the world (beyond ads on everything).
Then again, they’re valued at $50B as of today. With that much cash, do you really need a plan?

3 Comments The Google OS

  1. Nick Bradbury

    I don’t want to give Google *too* much credit, but it does seem that they have a master plan. The way they’re trying to loosen Microsoft’s grasp by getting people to move their data from the desktop to the web is very smart, and suggests to me that they know what they’re doing.

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  2. Richard Ziade

    I agree. It’s a very smart strategy. They’ve sort of broadsided Microsoft. And now, thanks to the markets, they’re a gorilla.
    My thinking is – is it really that hard to fend off a Google? Microsoft owns that wiring below and as long as they do they can always answer with what appears to be a richer, better tool. They’ve already promised a desktop search tool by year’s end.
    This reminds of the Netscape battle a little bit. Netscape effectively surprised Microsoft with the Navigator. Within two years, Internet Explorer matured and surpassed Navigator. It was not only a better browser (at the time) but you could tell that it was “closer to the metal” of the OS. Heck, it practically is part of the OS.
    Microsoft this time has an additional ally – Yahoo! They will let Yahoo! fight a lot of their battles for them.
    Google may very well have the Master Plan that’s factored all this. It will be interesting to watch it unfold.

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  3. Terrence McLean

    A big difference between Google and Netscape is that Google is producing very real revenue and profits from a source that will not go away. Microsoft was able to push out Netscape because they could give away the browser, thus destroying a major revenue/profit source for Netscape. As dominating as Microsoft is, they cannot take away Google’s massive revenue stream nor Google’s massive brand appeal by giving away what Google provides (although they may be able to chop away at it along with Yahoo).
    While Microsoft may be able to leverage its access to the OS in this effort, that will do fairly little in the next few years. More likely to help to dominate in this effort is MSOffice, where people spend most of their productive time.

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